Some Weapons In An Envious Collection...

Narrated by the proud owner

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   AR-10 (7.62x51mm) with a You Bet Your Ass Firearms Co. forged aluminum 80% lower, DPMS upper receiver and a Millett 6-25x56 scope.

Cerakote by Ryan Kidwell Windsor, CA

 

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1.   AR-15 (5.56mm) match rifle with White Oaks upper receiver, You Bet Your Ass Firearms Co. forged 80% lower, ACE Hammer buttstock and a Nikon 4.5-18x40 ProStaff 5 scope.  AKA “The Birthday Gun” ... it was a birthday gift from my wife and it's as accurate as she is! Thanks Babe!

 

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 AR-15 (5.56mm) with Your Bet Your Ass Firearms Co. forged aluminum 80% lower.

 

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  6.5mm Grendel with You Bet Your Ass Firearms Polymer 80% lower,

Alexander Arms upper and Nikon P-223 scope.

 

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   Beowulf .50 AR-15 based on a Rainier lower with  an Alexander Arms .50 Beowulf Precision upper utilizing a Vortex SPARC II red dot optic.

 

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   Springfield M1A1 7.62x51mm. Utilizing iron sights only.

 

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Chinese Army SKS semi-auto rifle circa 1948-50. Original stock was in such bad shape that replaced with the polymer aftermarket stock shown here. The rifle was thoroughly cleaned upon disassembly, oiled and reassembled with the new stock and appears to be ready to go.

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  Springfield 1903A2 Infantry rife (30-06) with Weaver scout scope    and polished bolt. The rifle retains its original stock and was refurbished in 1946 at the Benicia Armory. This is a very accurate piece of history.

 

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1.   Swedish 6.5mm Mauser with Accushot 2-7x36 scope.  An old military issue firearm with astounding accuracy. It's a joy to shoot.

 

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   Russian Moisin-Nagant 7.62x54R.  This rifle embodies a typical Russian credo of keeping it so simple the peasants could maintain and fire it.  The original stock was in very poor shape and replaced with a refurbished birch wood stock.  At the same time a Timney trigger/safety assembly was installed along with the humongous muzzle brake.  Not the most accurate rifle, but a lot of fun.

 

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Yugo 8mm Mauser. This rifle was bought on a whim from Big 5 Sporting Goods for about $275 and was my first vintage surplus fire arm. It was covered inside and out with some sort of impenetrable preservative that took forever to remove.  It was worth the effort plus I learned a lot about military surplus   rifles in the process. I also learned some new swear words too!

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Japanese Arisaka type 99 7.7mm. This rifle is all original and just as it was when captured on Tarawa in November of 1943 by a U.S. Marine.  The Imperial Chrysanthemum emblem was not defaced by the defeated Japanese (they were probably unable to do so) and the rare anti-aircraft sights are intact.  The Arisaka 99’s were manufactured with chrome bores and I am pleased to say that the bore on this rifle is still pristine 70+ years later.  It is not fired often and when it is, only low power cartridges are used in deference to its age.

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1.   Swiss Schmidt-Rubin K-31 7.5x55mm. The Karabiner Model 1931 (K31) is a magazine-fed, straight-pull bolt action rifle. It was the standard issue rifle of the Swiss armed forces from 1933 until 1958 though examples remained in service into the 1970s.  My K-31 is equipped with a Bushnell 3-9x32 scope on an offset mount in order to clear the action.  Takes about 30 seconds to get used to, however, one must remember when bore sighting you are actually sighting from right to left. Just imagine that scope is mounted to the right side of your rifle.

 

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   Ruger .204 custom by E.R. Shaw with a Leupold 4-12x40 scope.  A true tack driver in every sense of the word. It will give you consistent sub-MOA groups at 100 yards and still reach out over 200 yards.  One of the stars of my collection.

 

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Weatherby Vanguard .257 mag.  No scope currently mounted. If you’re looking for flat, accurate powerful shooting…..just get a Weatherby!

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     Savage 17HMR with a Vortex 4-12x40 scope.  Pure unadulterated fun with fantastic accuracy thrown in for good measure.  Wish I could use it on the squirrels invading my suburban backyard.

 

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     Browning .308 X Bolt Varmint with a Vortex 4-12x40 scope.  The stock is a bit on the wild side, however it is very comfortable. The bolt on the rifle is smooth as silk.

 

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1.    Parker-Hale custom rifle chambered in .270 with a McGowan barrel, Boyd’s stock and Leupold 4-12x40 scope. The box magazine was replaced with a Remington 300 removable 6 round capacity magazine.  To date I have put about 40 rounds through it, so we’re still getting acquainted.

 

 

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  Weatherby SA-08  16 gauge shotgun.

 

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1   Colt .357 Python with a 6” barrel and custom pink eucalyptus grips by Culina in Rocklin, CA.  Custom Python skin pistol holder by Carey Arms in San Jose, CA.

 

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Walther 9mm P-38 pistol.  This pistol was built by Mauser in 1943 and is a numbers matching piece with all of the authentic Nazi stampings. 

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    Smith & Wesson .460 revolver with an 8 inch barrel aka “Bubba”.  This monster shoots .460 mag, .454 Casull and .45 Long Colt rounds.  Dirty Harry would have loved this revolver!

 

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     Replica Colt .44 Buffalo gun. This is black powder, ball and percussion cap fire arm built from a kit of very rough castings and 2 blocks of wood for the grips. My Dremel tool met its end on this project, but it was very satisfying to finally finish it.  Although I do have the lead balls, I do not have the balls to fire it.

 

 

…….and a Special Thanks to John for setting me on this road, with his advice and “smithing” abilities.  It’s all much appreciated.

 
   
 

 

 

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  JohnCarey    

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